How Can a Native English Speaker Learn the Polish Language That You Should Know | Best Review

How Can a Native English Speaker Learn the Polish Language

Polish Language

Polish language is one of the most challenging Slavic languages to learn for native English speakers.
When people approach me for recommendations on what language to learn as a second language, I never recommend Polish. This isn’t because I despise Polish; on the contrary, I find it to be a fascinating and lovely language.

It’s one of the world’s most dynamic languages today. While I’m not competent to conduct document translation work in Polish language, it’s a language I like learning and paying attention to. It will be well worth the price of admission to see where Polish ends up as it navigates this difficult period in its history.

It will be well worth the price of admission to see where Polish ends up as it navigates this difficult period in its history.

Polish Language Sounds

After all, language is merely sounds, but creating the required sounds that make up a language can take a lot of practice, and Slavic languages like Polish language are particularly difficult for English speakers.

The noises might be extremely subtle in comparison to one another. Many of the words in Polish sounded the same to me when I first learned it — that’s infuriating. Someone may genuinely repeat two distinct phrases to you and have them seem identical, leading you to question whether they’re making a joke at your expense.

For instance, you may start to distinguish between “and “sz” with time and with some effort and expertise Polish language. But only after a significant amount of time and work. It’s just a different way of making sounds than we’re used to hearing in most Western languages.

Polish Language Grammar

Polish Language

Polish grammar is also complex in comparison to English. Polish, for example, has a case system. So you may say “on the box,” “under the box,” or “in the box” in English, and the term box will remain the same — once you learn the word box, you can rest since you know what it is means Polish language.

Like in other Slavic languages, the term meaning box in Polish changes depending on how it is used. You also have to consider modifiers like gender, which alter the meaning of the words.

Word order is also often different, with thinking organization nearly inverted from English, so that what you write at the beginning of an English phrase frequently ends up at the conclusion of a Polish sentence, and vice versa. Nevertheless, you can undoubtedly learn Polish language. I’m only stating that it will be one of the most challenging languages to master.

To read more exciting blog: https://24x7offshoring.com/blog/

Polish Language is a simple language to learn.

First and first, let me state unequivocally that no language is “difficult to learn.” There is no language that can’t be learned. You can indeed become fluent in Polish quickly and easily if you have the necessary materials and determination.

However, how difficult it is to learn a language is primarily determined by how similar it is to your original tongue Polish language. So, here’s an honest assessment of how difficult it is for English speakers to learn Polish.

When it comes to learning Polish Language, how long does it take?Polish Language

The length of time it takes to learn a language and the language’s difficulty are two quite similar questions. The more complex a language is, the longer it takes to learn. That’s why the US Foreign Service Institute (FSI) graded the languages according to their complexity before assigning a time estimate.

The FSI provides the following figures for individuals who want to know how long it takes to learn Polish: Polish language is classified as a Category 4 language. Therefore, please remember to take these figures with a grain of salt.

Three Reasons Why Polish Language Is Difficult to Learn

1. It’s Difficult to Pronounce Polish

Any student cringes when they see the term “bezwzgldny.” It’s difficult for anybody to pronounce this beast. The fact that it also means “ruthless” feels strangely apt. In the Polish language, consonant clusters are pretty prevalent. And pronouncing them appears to be a challenge. However, pronouncing particular letters might be difficult Polish language. Letters like,.

Take this into account, though. It is not more difficult to learn English pronunciation than it is to know Polish accent. For foreigners, mastering the “th” sound, for example, is quite challenging. So you’ve already completed the task. Nothing stands in the way of your mastering Polish pronunciation.

2. There are three genders in Polish.

This is a difficult pill for students to swallow. Even though English people are unfamiliar with the idea of grammatical genders, it is highly prevalent Polish language. There are three genders in German. Both the Spanish and the French, for example, have two.

To make things a bit easier, separating Polish genders is relatively simple. Neuter nouns generally finish in “-o,” whereas feminine nouns usually end in “-a.” The rest of the time, everything is typically macho. Polish also lacks articles, so you won’t have to worry about gendered articles as you would in German.

3. In Polish, there are seven cases.

Grammatical cases indicate the function of a word in a sentence in Polish language. Unfortunately, there are only four grammatical cases in most languages:

• Nominative (when the word is the subject).
• Accusative (when the word is the direct object).
• Dative (when the word is the indirect object).
• Genitive (when the word is the indirect object) (when the word is possessive).
Polish grammatical cases, on the other hand, are on steroids. In Polish grammar, nouns, pronouns, and adjectives have seven separate issues. They also have instrumental, locative, and vocative cases in addition to the three already mentioned in Polish language.

Continue reading, just click on: https://24x7offshoring.com/blog/

Slavic languages: https://slavic.fas.harvard.edu/pages/what-are-slavic-languages
words in Polish sounded: https://culture.pl/en/article/the-9-most-unpronounceable-words-in-polish
alter the meaning of the words: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/alter
English speakers to learn Polish: https://www.babbel.com/learn-polish
US Foreign Service Institute (FSI): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_Service_Institute
learn English pronunciation: https://www.englishclub.com/pronunciation/

 

 

How Can a Native English Speaker Learn the Polish Language That You Should Know | Best Review

Polish language

Polish (Polish: język polski, [ˈjɛ̃zɨk ˈpɔlskʲi] (audio speaker iconlisten), polszczyzna [pɔlˈʂt͡ʂɨzna] (audio speaker iconlisten) or simply polski, [ɔpɔlicic vernacular] It is widely spoken in Poland and serves as an official Polish language. In addition to being an official Polish language, it is also used by young Polish immigrants in other countries. There are more than 50 million Polish speakers worldwide – the sixth most widely spoken language in the European Union. [10] Polish is divided into regional dialects and maintains strong T-V separation pronouns, titles and various types of procedures when communicating with individuals.

Polish is composed of traditional Polish characters consisting of 32 characters, with nine additions to the standard Latin alphabet with 26 letters (ą, ć, ę, ł, ń, ó, ś, ź, ż). The letters x, q and v are sometimes inserted in the alphabet with 35 extant letters, however, these are not used in traditional names. [The set consists of 23 consonants and 9 written vowels, including two nasal vowels defined by a reversible diacritic chicken called “ogonek” (ę, ą). [13] Polish is a seven-component synthetic and compound language, ] and is one of the few languages ​​in the world with chronic stress without just a few exceptions, and is the only group with a consonant of many words. Modern Polish varieties were developed in the 1700s as heir to the Medieval Old Polish (10th-16th century) and Middle Polish (16th-18th century).

Among the major languages, it is closely related to Slovak [ and Czech,  but differs in pronunciation and grammar. In addition, Polish was strongly influenced by Latin and other Romance languages ​​such as Italian and French as well as German (especially German) languages, which contributed to a large number of similar loan words and structures.  The widespread use of vernacular languages ​​has also shaped the common language; great communication and speeches borrowed directly from German or Yiddish, and were later adopted into the traditional Polish language used on a daily basis.

Historically, Polish was the most widely used language, [24] [25] importantly speaking both verbally and academically in Central and part of Eastern Europe. Today, Polish is spoken by about 38 million people as their first Polish language. It is also spoken as a second language in eastern Germany, in the north of the Czech Republic and in Slovakia, in the western parts of Belarus and Ukraine, and in the southeast of Lithuania and Latvia. As a result of migration from Poland at different times, especially after World War II, millions of Polish-speaking people could be found in countries such as Canada, Argentina, Brazil, Israel, Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States.

How Can a Native English Speaker Learn the Polish Language

Polish Language

Polish language is one of the most challenging Slavic languages to learn for native English speakers.


When people approach me for recommendations on what language to learn as a second language, I never recommend Polish. This isn’t because I despise Polish; on the contrary, I find it to be a fascinating and lovely language.

It’s one of the world’s most dynamic languages today. While I’m not competent to conduct document translation work in Polish language, it’s a language I like learning and paying attention to. It will be well worth the price of admission to see where Polish ends up as it navigates this difficult period in its history.

It will be well worth the price of admission to see where Polish ends up as it navigates this difficult period in its history.

Is it difficult for a native English speaker to learn Polish?

I would say that it is difficult for someone who speaks native English to learn Polish if that person encounters the Polish language for the first time when he or she is older. Of course, if a child is lucky enough to have a Polish mother and an American father, then it is different. I have a British friend who lives in Poland with his Polish wife. They have two daughters who change their language from one eyelid to the other depending on the parent. From birth, they have had the opportunity to discover their own languages ​​around Polish and the child’s mind is a sponge of true language.

Learning English Polish

However, when I get older, I think that something happens to the brain that makes language difficult to find. No matter how hard I try, I will never be able to hide my pronunciation when I speak Polish or find my language right next to those Polish churchgoers who find Polish jokes so much that they hear me try to say it; I started too late. Some Polish sounds are not available in English. And for someone who speaks native English it is often difficult to distinguish between the other sounds not to mention uttering them; I’ve had people spend years at the pub trying to make me feel the difference between “ś” and “sz”. And it took me about five years to live in Poland before I heard the difference.

Despite the difficulty of pronouncing words in Polish, he also discovered a Polish grammar. This is a complete nightmare for native English speakers because the grammar is completely different from theirs. Polish is a Slavic language and therefore has a criminal system. The case system states that nouns and adjectives are rejected in order to give the original meaning usually given in English. In English, whether “over the table”, “under the table”, or “behind the table”, the word “table” remains the same. Not so in Polish. There are seven different scenarios as well as seven different “table” words depending on the relevance of the item discussed in the table. As if that didn’t make things hard enough, you should also reject the adjectives so that there are seven ways to say “wooden table”. And to make matters worse you have three different types of sex for all nouns that come down in different ways. The Polish grammar is not a walk in the park.

The order of the words is also different from the English. In the homework I marked when working as an English teacher in Poland, I often found phrases like “Torun” in many shops “instead of” There are many shops in Toruń “. This error reflects the thinking of Polish. I have to put what at the beginning of the Polish sentence at the end of the English sentence.

Even if you have started to make your language revolve around the pronunciation and your head around the grammar and word order, there are still a lot of proverbs and adventures that often confuse strangers.

So in all, what about Polish pronunciation, grammar, word order, idioms and slang, I would say yes, it is really difficult for an English-speaking adult to learn Polish even though it is impossible. The whole journey begins with the first step.

5 Reasons Why Polish Language Is So Hard

We have his birthday party on Saturday. Do you want to come ?, ”asked the mother of my 7-year-old student.

I had heard and soon realized that learning the Polish language was a real challenge, especially for the native English-speaking people. But I have also heard that Polish people always appreciate you when you try to speak it. So as I was entertaining people in this way, I downloaded Google Translate, and wrote “Yes. I’m happy, ”and I gave my best shot.

There are a few glimpses of the horrible speeches in this world that can tell you that you have just said one shocking phrase in a Polish dictionary in response to a birthday invitation for a 7-year-old child.

I have learned 3 very important things in this exchange:

I will never forget how to say “I am horny” in Polish too.

I will never forget the proper way to say “happy” (podekscytowany).

Google Translate is not my friend.

It is no secret that learning Polish is a major challenge for native Englishmen; the way their consonants are grouped into garbage and the endings of nouns seem to change randomly throughout the sentence. There are 14 different ways of saying the singular noun and the plural forms together, the system of word order, colored consonants, syllables, and other complexities that make it a very painful headache to try to learn from the beginning.

But do not be afraid! Taking Polish lessons with a native and immersing yourself in culture can make a quick lesson for anyone. You may not be able to speak as well as you would when you were learning other languages, but the people of Poland greatly appreciate your sarcastic efforts. Clear your way in a sentence and they may just slap you on the back and buy you vodka to speed up your reading experience.

That being said, here are 5 reasons why Polish is such a difficult language to learn English.

Reduction

In Polish, there are fiction, birth, date, amazing, used, local, and noun pronouns, pronouns, and double adjectives when you add the plural. That is a total of 14 cases. In English we have 2, 1 singular and 1 plural: dog and dog, for example. Knowing which one to use depends on how you use it in a sentence. Here are 7 cases of unity and exemplary sentences.

We will use “dog” or “pie” as our object in these examples.

Nomination case – This is a dog = Making funny pies.

Genitive case – I do not like this dog = Nie lubię tego psa.

Metal case – Dog = Jesteś psem.

The accuser – I have a dog = Mam psa.

Dative case – I feed my dog ​​= Daję jedzenie mojemu psu.

Vocative – Dog, please, talk to me! = Psie, Błagam, mów do mnie!

Location – dog = Jestem na psie.

Local and calling conditions have the same connotations of the singular “dog” case, as do birth and litigation cases. However, they can change depending on the noun, adjective, or pronoun. It’s hard, I know.

If you know full well how to use declensions in Polish as a native English speaker, you have great power beyond comprehension and you should be considered a linguist.

Free Word Order

We may not accept chaos when it comes to grammar, but Poles accepts it. In general, they adhere to the action-action standard; However, it is very common to put a system together to emphasize one part of a sentence over another.

Take this sentence as an example: “I will go to work tomorrow.”

Posted by pracy jutro. This sentence is simple enough and easy to translate. However, you may also say:

Posted by jutro do pracy. This is translated as “I will go to work tomorrow.” They say the same thing, but with an emphasis on when I will work, which is the future.

Jutro do pracy pójdę. That’s when he started to get mad, saying, “Tomorrow at work I’ll go,” which sounded like Master Yoda talking.

In English we put “I will go” at the beginning or in the middle, with the heavy word “tomorrow” at the beginning or end of a sentence to emphasize when.

It may not seem very difficult when you make simple sentences like the ones above, but if you go into building long sentences and fragments, it can be a nightmare.

Pronunciation

If you read Polish, the phrase “I can buy a vowel” seems more effective than ever.

If you have grown up speaking English all your life, it is unlikely that you will utter a single word in a few syllables that are grouped together.

Words that seem phonetically simple in English, such as “happiness”, take on a new level of difficulty when pronounced in Polish.

     Szczęście (sh-ch-ayn-sh-ch-e)

“E” is ultimately a short “e,” such as “bet,” but all the consonants are all made up of real language distortions.

Or try uttering the best Polish word using only Polish characters:

     Żółć (zh-oo-w-ch)

The word “Ż” is initially similar to the second g in the word garage and makes the same sound. The “ł” sound is similar to the “w” sound. Well this name and you will be loved far and wide. Use it in a sentence and you will become a world-famous prince at your feet.

Also, said bile.

These two words in particular are the Poles’ favorite to hear foreigners say, as they highlight two complexes that often pronounce consonants and understand the letters of the alphabet.

Numbers And Numbers

Saying a number in English is as simple as 1,2,3 … but in Polish it is a different story. There are 22 ways to say two, double, or double, and they are noun, adjective, and pronoun.

For example, two are alone. However, it changes even more than the above.

dwa koty = two cats

dwie kobiety = two women

dwóch mężczyzn = two men

dwiema rękami = with both hands

dwóm osobom = to two people

dwaj panowie = two men (like men / gentlemen)

The list goes on and on down the 22 tears paths to mean 2. The numerical methods of combining it all are really difficult to compare with all the different cases. I know that does not make you feel better, but just know that this little grammar nugget has been a source of controversy and interest for a long time even among Poles.

The word “się”

We have nothing like this in English, but your closest translation is when you refer to “me,” as in you, he, she, etc.,

However, if you see it working, it may make a little sense to beginners. Think of it as a dynamic story in which a person, when he does something, gets the result of that action.

For example, if I say: “Uczę się polskiego.” This translates to “I am learning Polish.”

However, the verb “uczyć” means to teach, so the sentence can be read as “I teach myself Polish”. You use the word “się” in this sentence to show that you are the recipient of the action and that you are educating yourself.

Myjemy.

This means we are bathing. However, if you wanted to say “wash yourself,” as you all do, you could use:

Myjemy się.

Another simple example to keep in mind.

He helped Adam.

Usually, this means “My name is Adam.” It literally means “I call myself Adam”, so you need a się to show that this is what you call yourself.

It may seem unnecessary to show that you are doing something for yourself because it is easily thought out in English, but in Polish it is necessary to say.

Is It Not Easy to Learn Polish or Fun?

I’m glad I asked. Yes there is. Here are a few of my favorite things about the Polish language that make reading easy and fun:

No Topics – no topics so you do not have to learn the grammar rules for those; however, deterioration is frustrating enough.

Months of the Year – Polish months are very exciting as they translate different meanings about what could happen to nature or the world at that time of year. One example is Styczeń, i.e. January also means “reunion” or “joining” as last year it reunited with a new one.

Bad words – they will probably be the first ones you learn and, to be honest, it ‘s really fun to say them because there are so many of them.

Only 3 Tenses – of course. There is a present, past, and future tense only in Polish.

Spelling and Pronunciation – Unlike English, Polish words sound good in spelling, so there are no surprises if you are familiar with the phonetic alphabet.

Polish is very difficult to learn if you do not know other Slavic cousin languages ​​before you try to learn. However, the local people are proud of their language and its complexity; so, try to take a lesson and talk whenever you can and they will love you for it.

How to Learn Polish for Beginners. Detailed guide.

Want to learn Polish? Let’s start with simple things. You will learn a REAL, SURE way to learn Polish so you do not fail. What else? You will start to talk about Polish phrases that you should know.

I also include FREE audio, PDF and video tutorials here.

If you find this helpful, please email a friend! Asambe.

Introduction in Polish

Is It Hard to Learn Polish?

Why Learn Polish?

How to Study Effectively

Polish Greeting Phrases and Phrases to Know (MP3 Tutorial)

How to Read and Write: Polish Alphabet Study (PDF Study)

Polish resources

Learn to Count in Polish (Video Study)

1. Polish introduction

Polish is an Indo-European language with about 55 million speakers worldwide. Apparently it is spoken in Poland. Unlike many Slavic languages, Polish uses the Cyrillic alphabet… but the Latin alphabet. But it also has 9 more characters – ą, ć, ę, ł, ń, ó, ś, ź, ż.

Here’s what the Polish Alphabet looks like. You will learn more in section 6. Let’s keep it simple for now.

learn Polish alphabet

Scroll down to section 5 for a sound lesson and hear how Polish sounds.

2) Is It Hard to Learn Polish?

My answer? It’s as simple as you think it is. Yes, the sounds and words and grammar are different. But if you approach it with a resounding “yes, I can learn it if I spend a lot of time and consistency,” it is best to walk away. If you think “nah, it sounds too hard,” well, kill your reading right here.

Here are some basic facts:

Polish is easier for people who know the Slavic language… such as Bulgarian or Russian. Why? Similar words and sounds. There are similarities.

It can be difficult if you are an English-speaking person. Why? The same reason why the Japanese Japanese are a challenge – NOT the same as English. There are so many new things to learn. Nothing to do with it.

Do not let that scare you. Millions are learning Japanese and Korean at present. They read with interest. And they succeed. Just because they like it, they want to learn and they are hopeful about it.

Therefore, Polish is very real.

3. Why Learn Polish?

If you read this, you already know the answer. I can’t convince you. But… I can show you why some are learning Polish. Why? Most do it for people: friends, family, loved ones and Slavic people who want to know their Slavic neighbors. Others want to connect with their heritage.

Hello, I speak two languages ​​Spanish and English but since my grandfather was Polish he wanted to read and speak it.

My boyfriend is polishing and okay I am learning the language to speak.

I am Russian. I love learning foreign languages ​​and have been studying Polish since 2007.

I was originally from Poland but grew up in the US speaking English so…

I am Polish, but I grew up in California since I was four years old. I would really like to regain my mother tongue.

A Bulgarian guy here… recently moved to Poland to work for a large IT company… so you know why I want to study 🙂

I am a retired man but as a Polish citizen and I wish to visit Krakow one day soon

What about you? Leave me a comment.

4) How to Learn Effectively

Let’s say “yes, I can read it!” for Part 2. Good!

What’s next? Do you need to BUY more textbooks? No !!! Let’s talk about goals. Learning Polish in any language is a big goal. An obscure goal. So let’s make it easy. Let’s move on to simple, small, measurable, realistic goals with a deadline. For example:

Learn 100 Polish words this month. July 31 (anytime).

King of the Alphabet in 1 week. December 15th.

Speak Polish for 1 minute this month. December 31st.

Write an introduction of 5 sentences in Polish in 1 week. December 4th.

Pay attention here. All of this is measurable. You can speak for 1 minute or know 100 amagama words or not. And the goals are small and easy – what to read 100 words a month? That’s like reading 3-5 words a day! Lastly, the deadline is to give you the date you should aim for. Either you hit it or you miss it.

Set goals like these and you will succeed.

Small, measurable goals are simple; you know when you hit them. Big obscure terms… as smooth as they are not. Will you ever know if you are fluent? No! Conversely, I do not even know English well… but it does exist!

5. Polish Greetings & Sentences You Should Know (MP3 Lesson)

Let’s read Polish phrases so you can talk a little.

Hello / Hello (informal)

Cześć!

Sent: Chesht

Good day (organized)

See dobry.

Pronounced: Djin dobri

I’ll see you! Goodbye! (informal)

Perform zaczenia.

Spoken: Doh they scolded

Go formal

Is widzenia.

pronounced: Doh widzenya

I will not leave you wanting more. Below, a free Polish tutorial from PolishPod101.com (an online Polish tutorial with Audio and Video Tutorials – click here to check it out.) Press the play button.

Audio Player

00:00

00:00

Use the Up / Down arrow keys to turn up or down.

6. How to Read and Write: Polish Vocabulary (PDF Study)

Want to learn to write the Polish Alphabet?

Below is a FREE PDF Tutorial – to print. Basically, it is a reference to the characters and their sounds. Do you really need to practice writing them? Yes, why not… but the letters are very similar to English. So, you have already managed about 80% of it already.

learn to polish7. Polish resources

Now that you know how to study effectively, you can find REAL learning materials.

But … there are no great places to read online …

So, what do I suggest?

A) Textbooks. Go to Amazon.com (click here) for Polish books – take a look at yourself and see what the best rates and prices are. Textbooks are a safe way to read… (even if they are a little boring).

read polishing booksB) PolishPod101. 100s Audio and Video Tutorials for Polish Teachers.

It is an online Polish learning website and course. Good for Beginners and allows you to learn at your own pace. They have a wide range of audio and video lessons from beginner to advanced level. You get new lessons every week to keep them growing.

So, if you do not know Polish, it is a good first step.

Polish Language Sounds

After all, language is merely sounds, but creating the required sounds that make up a language can take a lot of practice, and Slavic languages like Polish language are particularly difficult for English speakers.

The noises might be extremely subtle in comparison to one another. Many of the words in Polish sounded the same to me when I first learned it — that’s infuriating. Someone may genuinely repeat two distinct phrases to you and have them seem identical, leading you to question whether they’re making a joke at your expense.

For instance, you may start to distinguish between “and “sz” with time and with some effort and expertise Polish language. But only after a significant amount of time and work. It’s just a different way of making sounds than we’re used to hearing in most Western languages.

Polish Language Grammar

Polish Language

Polish grammar is also complex in comparison to English. Polish, for example, has a case system. So you may say “on the box,” “under the box,” or “in the box” in English, and the term box will remain the same — once you learn the word box, you can rest since you know what it is means Polish language.

Like in other Slavic languages, the term meaning box in Polish changes depending on how it is used. You also have to consider modifiers like gender, which alter the meaning of the words.

Word order is also often different, with thinking organization nearly inverted from English, so that what you write at the beginning of an English phrase frequently ends up at the conclusion of a Polish sentence, and vice versa. Nevertheless, you can undoubtedly learn Polish language. I’m only stating that it will be one of the most challenging languages to master.

To read more exciting blog: https://24x7offshoring.com/blog/

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